30 Days of Devotion I: Introducing Ares


Sorry if I’m jumping the gun on this, but I saw this over at Ibrium’s  blog, who in turn got it from Sannion and Ruadhán, and thought I’d give it a go. Honestly, breaking my silence and moving away from the epistolary side of things (and I’m still waiting on letters from some folks, hint hint) makes me a bit uncomfortable, but until anyone indicates their contrary opinion, I’m okay with doing this. I consider today, Veterans/Remembrance Day, as particularly auspicious considering it marks the foolish attempt of man to end a war to end all wars. Of course, we all know how well both aims went.

So anyway, I’m obviously doing my series on Ares, which of course ties in very well with my previous Ares 101 series, and will hopefully keep me from getting absolutely burnt out writing for a single outlet (btw, I’m a newspaper editor now).  The basic structure of the exercise is given below, and today’s is about introducing Ares.

I think I’ve covered the bare basics about Ares rather extensively, but to recap, Ares is the Olympian god of war, bloodshed, rebellion, divine retribution, and (traditional) masculinity. So much of what I could write will be covered in proceeding articles, but for now I’ll say Ares is a god, not dead (though not really alive so much as simply being I’d venture[silly atheists]), and is worshiped by fewer today than should be, though this is slowly changing.

I. A basic introduction of the deity
II. How did you become first aware of this deity?
III. Symbols and icons of this deity
IV. A favorite myth or myths of this deity
V. Members of the family – genealogical connections
VI. Other related deities and entities associated with this deity
VII. Names and epithets
VIII. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
IX. Common mistakes about this deity
X. Offerings – historical and UPG
XI. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
XII. Places associated with this deity and their worship
XIII. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
XIV. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
XV. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
XVI. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
XVII. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
XVIII. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
XIX. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
XX. Art that reminds you of this deity
XXI. Music that makes you think of this deity
XXII. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
XXIII. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
XXIV. A time when this deity has helped you
XXV. A time when this deity has refused to help
XXVI. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
XXVII. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
XXVIII. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
XXIX. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
XXX. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

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